Art

Art is hard. Any form of it, and I think that is a worldwide accepted fact. Lately I have to remind myself this and shut out the heavy heart that follows criticism. I have to fight through wanting to give up, drop the brush and pencil, again. Long ago, I forgot what it felt like to have fun with, to enjoy, art and not want to cry because I didn’t get a “wow” or “that’s really good!” I actually began to hide my artwork because I felt the need to protect myself; I poured all my emotions at the time into my pieces and to be told that they needed to be corrected translated into something else.
What I got was that I drew too many skeletons. My work was too stylized.
I started to get angry. I wanted to shout that they weren’t saying Picasso worked in cubism too often, Monet painted too many landscapes, Jacob Lawrence did too many collages, and Andy Goldsworthy should do something other than Land Art.
My escape, my way out of pain, who I was through paint didn’t need to be corrected. There is no correct personality.  I held onto that thought for a very long time but I also stopped drawing and slowly I have stopped painting.
However… I am beginning again but this time I am seeking help from books. Books don’t tell you what to draw and how often you should draw it– they show you methods of how to draw. That’s what’s important. So I will draw as many messed up faces, skeletons, stylized scenes, and paint non-symmetrical paintings as I damn well please.

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5 thoughts on “Art

  1. I used to withdraw too, but not out of fear of criticism. In fact, I do more abstract work now because people used to say, “I don’t get it”. I tell young artists that they should paint what they want to paint and not worry about feedback. They feel the same way you do when they are criticised for following their passion. Because someone loves carving skeletons, and thought they’d make nice jewelry, I wear a skull bracelet on my wrist every day and now lots of people think skulls are cute, too. This is really all about you. Good luck with your work.

  2. Thank you for sharing your personal artistic journey. I can totally relate to your experience of shutting down. It’s great that you are fighting to practise and improve. Wishing you all the best throughout your creative process 🙂

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